en Fender Blackface Vibrolux Reverb amp chassis pics

Updated on March 15, 2020 | 490 Views all
0 on March 15, 2020

had a chance to check out the chassis. Blackface and Silverface amps are far from my taste but people around me have lots of them. and I’m getting into them.

 

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